Hattingdon® Christmas Hat Countdown — #1

Let’s get right to it. Here is the #1 Hattingdon Christmas Hat of 2015.

The Nicky Hattingdon design.
The Nicky Hattingdon design.

The Nicky Christmas hat edged the Plum Pudding design for first place by only a few dozen sales. 2015 was Plum’s biggest year to date.

Don’t go away just yet.

We can’t leave our countdown without telling you a bit about the poinsettia plant and how it became so strongly associated with Christmas.

The following is from the website of our friends at WhyChristmas.com.

“Poinsettia plants are native to Central America, especially an area of southern Mexico known as ‘Taxco del Alarcon’ where they flower during the winter. The ancient Aztecs called them ‘cuetlaxochitl’.

“The Aztecs had many uses for them including using the flowers (actually special types of leaves known as bracts rather than being flowers) to make a purple dye for clothes and cosmetics and the milky white sap was made into a medicine to treat fevers. (Today we call the sap latex!)

“The poinsettia was made widely known because of a man called Joel Roberts Poinsett (that’s why we call them Poinsettia!). He was the first Ambassador from the USA to Mexico in 1825.”

“He was the first Ambassador from the USA to Mexico in 1825. Poinsett had some greenhouses on his plantations in South Carolina, and while visiting the Taco area in 1828, he became very interested in the plants. He immediately sent some of the plants back to South Carolina, where he began growing the plants and sending them to friends and botanical gardens.

“The shape of the poinsettia flower and leaves are sometimes thought as a symbol of the Star of Bethlehem which led the Wise Men to Jesus. The red colored leaves symbolize the blood of Christ. The white leaves represent his purity.”


Shop the Nicky Hattingdon Collection


Shop Top Ten Christmas Cards Collection


Shop Top Ten Christmas Postage Collection


Thank you for spending time here with us. Happy Holidays!

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